Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round

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Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round,bob综合体育平台怎么样Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung roundPeter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round,Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round,Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round

Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round,bob sportsPeter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round,Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung roundbob体育下载链接app

Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round,bob官方体育appPeter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round

Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round,bob体育平台怎么样,bob棋牌靠谱吗Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round

Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round,bob全球体育投注Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung roundbob体育平台怎么样,Peter. "We've been over all this.""Gentlemen." Mr. Dempster replaced his glasses. "I made it clear, Ithought, that I was not suggesting any fundamental change.""But I am, Mr. Dempster." If there was to be a showdown, Peter thought,better to have it now, and done with. Either he would run the hotel or not.This seemed as good a time as any to find out.The man from Montreal leaned forward. "Let me be sure I understand yourposition."An inner cautioning voice warned Peter he was being reckless. He ignoredit. "My position is quite simple. I would insist on complete desegregationof the hotel as a condition of my employment.""Aren't you being somewhat hasty in dictating terms?"Peter said quietly, "I assume your question to mean that you are aware ofcertain personal matters .Mr. Dempster nodded. "Yes, we are."Christine, Peter observed, had her eyes intently on his face. He wonderedwhat she was thinking."Hasty or not," he said, "I think it's fair to let you know where I stand."Mr. Dempster was once more polishing his glasses. He addressed the room atlarge. "I imagine we all respect a firmly held conviction. Even so, itseems to me that this is the kind of issue where we might temporize. If Mr.McDermott will agree, we can postpone a firm decision now. Then, in a monthor two, the subject can be reconsidered."If Mr. McDermott will agree. Peter thought: With diplomatic skill, the manfrom Montreal had offered him a way out.It followed an established pattern. Insistence first, conscience appeased,a belief declared. Then mild concession. A reasonable compromise reached byreasonable men. The367 HOTELsubject can be reconsidered. What could be more civilized, more eminentlysane? Wasn7t it the moderate, nonviolent kind of attitude which mostpeople favored? The dentists, for example. Their official letter, with theresolution deploring the hotel's action in the case of Dr. Nicholas, hadarrived today.It was also true: there were difficulties facing the hotel. It was anunpropitious time. A change of management would produce a crop ofproblems, never mind inventing new ones. To wait, perhaps, would be thewisest choice.But then, the time for drastic change was never right. There were alwaysreasons for not doing things. Someone, Peter remembered, had said thatrecently. Who?Dr. Ingram. The fiery dentists' president who resigned because hebelieved that principle was more important than expediency, who had quitthe St. Gregory Hotel last night in righteous anger.Once in a while, Dr. Ingram had said, you have to weigh what you wantagainst what you believe in ... You didn't do it, McDermott, when you hadthe chance. You were too worried about this hotel, your job ...Sometimes, though, you get a second chance. if it happens to youtake it."Mr. Dempster," Peter said, "the law on civil rights is perfectly clear.Whether we delay or circumvent it for a while, in the end the result willbe the same.""The way I hear it," the man from Montreal remarked, "there's a good dealof argument about States' rights."Peter shook his head impatiently. His gaze swung round

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